Women in LGBTQ + History Month

February 1st marks the start of LGBTQ + History Month, I wanted to put together a piece that highlighted women whose stories aren’t popularly known, but should be. If you have heard of the Danish Girl, then you’ll be familiar with Lili Elbe‘s story. This story is significant as Lili was one of the firstContinue reading “Women in LGBTQ + History Month”

Pocahontas: The Imperialist Truth Hidden Behind the Disney Film

Pocahontas has always been my favourite Disney film. To me she wasn’t illustrated like the other ‘Princesses’ – she was strong minded and adventurous. Characteristics that even as an adult I still resonate with. It was in the first lockdown that I listened to Greg Jenner’s Homeschool History episode on Pocahontas. He divulged the realContinue reading “Pocahontas: The Imperialist Truth Hidden Behind the Disney Film”

The Women Who Helped Get Modern Vaccines to Where They Are Today

Following the great news that the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine is approved for use last week (30th December 2020), here are some women that over the years have been influential in creating vaccines. The first is Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1689 – 1762) who introduced the smallpox inoculation into Western Medicine. While visiting the Ottoman Empire,Continue reading “The Women Who Helped Get Modern Vaccines to Where They Are Today”

The Immortal Dead: Memorials to the Fallen of the First World War

November 11th 1920. The Cenotaph was unveiled to the British public. It stands in Whitehall, as the national War Memorial for the United Kingdom. Just a year before on the Peace Day Celebrations, Edwin Lutyens erected a temporary wooden memorial in the same place, as a representation of those whose bodies remain elsewhere. From thatContinue reading “The Immortal Dead: Memorials to the Fallen of the First World War”

The Disabled Suffragette

Rosa May Billinghurst was branded the “cripple suffragette” by the press and her peers after a bout of childhood polio left her unable to walk. Known as ‘May’, she wore leg-irons and used either crutches or a modified tricycle. Her visibility attracted a lot of attention to the movement, and unlike many of her middle-classContinue reading “The Disabled Suffragette”

“I was always more than a label” Coretta Scott King

“Behind every great man there’s a great woman”. What a bullshit quote. In a supportive relationship a man and woman can complement each other really well, but a woman isn’t great just because a man is. No more should we be seeing women in history as the feature of a notable man. Coretta Scott KingContinue reading ““I was always more than a label” Coretta Scott King”

A Short History of Women’s Rugby

This blog was written for Herstory Club, under their monthly theme of the history of women in sport. When we think of rugby players, traditionally we think of big, tall, muscly (and hairy!) men, who run and bash into each other and then celebrate with a pint or two. You would never think of aContinue reading “A Short History of Women’s Rugby”

Enid Bell

This blog was written as apart of myself and Lucy Betteridge-Dyson’s blog series, World War Women. Women from all walks of life made a contribution to the First World War, even the daughter of the man who would later become Prime Minister of New Zealand. Beatrice Enid Bell was born in Wellington in 1888, toContinue reading “Enid Bell”

L’ange Français – Nicole Girard-Mangin

This blog was written as apart of myself and Lucy Betteridge-Dyson’s blog series, World War Women. Today, our doctors and nurses have been indispensable, not just in the United Kingdom, but all over the world. They have kept those in need alive and ensured those who suffered were (and are) well looked after. The sameContinue reading “L’ange Français – Nicole Girard-Mangin”